La Bon Vie


Theses: Museum of New Media Art

1.) The Museum of New Media Art should be available online for everyone to see and share new innovations.

2.)The Museum should allow for active discussions throughout its archive. This meaning chat rooms about certain types of work. 

3.)There should be a description of the piece and its creator, and other similar work by other artists.

4.)Needs to categorize different artworks by genre, artists, technology based etc.

5.)The Museum needs to be a place that can not be tampered with, needs to show the importance of all of the pieces it archives for future generations. 

6.)Knowing that new media pieces are constantly being made, the museum of new media art needs to store all pieces regardless of their date of creation.

7.)The Museum needs to not be constrained to one single audience, or artists, it should be open to various ideas and creations. 

8.)A museum of New Media Art should not take away from any particular piece. Meaning that if there is a video it should be shown at the quality that it was made by the artist. 

9.)The Museum should encompass various artworks from around the world and not solely focus on one particular region, this emphasizes creativity.

10.)There can not be monthly fees to view the page of a New Media Art Museum, because the creativity needs to be seen by all and not just a few selected people.

Tagged: arts12theses

Artist: Adam Somlai-Fischer & Bengt Sjolen

Title: Aleph

Date of Creation: Able to view until September 2007

Location: 

http://goo.gl/FCM17

http://goo.gl/O3mR2


Aleph was created for the purpose of spatial analysis. This piece is created from cars’ side view mirrors. The concept behind it is that when one is to look at one individual mirror we should only be able to see a fraction of the space around us, but when we look at the piece in its entirety it reflects most things around us, or in other words giving us a bigger picture of the small fractions. This piece is technologically advanced because a computer is constantly analyzing the surroundings, that send the information to micro controllers positioned in the mirrors to display various images at once. Each mirror contains a small image that plays a significant role in the bigger overall image. Let the video amaze you! 

Tagged: arts12gallery1

Artists: Brian Goggin
Title: Speechless
Date of Creation: 2008-2009
Location: http://goo.gl/1JNB3
One single page taken from every book available at the Lafayette Library in Lafayette California make up this wavering bronze stack of paper. Brian Goggin, has captured nature in the most natural way. He has made this sculpture interact as if it were free flowing. This meaning that he placed this piece at an angle, and had some pages fly into the air as well as the stairs going up to the library and around the plaza as if wind were naturally blowing on it. This piece frees information from its traditional limits, that being books and having each individual page be of enormous value.  

Artists: Brian Goggin

Title: Speechless

Date of Creation: 2008-2009

Location: http://goo.gl/1JNB3

One single page taken from every book available at the Lafayette Library in Lafayette California make up this wavering bronze stack of paper. Brian Goggin, has captured nature in the most natural way. He has made this sculpture interact as if it were free flowing. This meaning that he placed this piece at an angle, and had some pages fly into the air as well as the stairs going up to the library and around the plaza as if wind were naturally blowing on it. This piece frees information from its traditional limits, that being books and having each individual page be of enormous value.  

Tagged: arts12gallery1

Artists: Brian Goggin
Title: Samson
Date of Creation: 1998
Location: http://goo.gl/euMr7

Seven hundred pieces of refurbished luggage, standing at 23-foot tall pillars, both of this pieces are at the center of an airport. Visually, one is able to see that the baggage’s are the support that maintain the ceiling from crumbling down, however that is not the case. In fact this piece was done to show that the travelers themselves are the ones who have not allowed the airport ceiling from crumbling down, in a metaphorical sense of course! 

Artists: Brian Goggin

Title: Samson

Date of Creation: 1998

Location: http://goo.gl/euMr7


Seven hundred pieces of refurbished luggage, standing at 23-foot tall pillars, both of this pieces are at the center of an airport. Visually, one is able to see that the baggage’s are the support that maintain the ceiling from crumbling down, however that is not the case. In fact this piece was done to show that the travelers themselves are the ones who have not allowed the airport ceiling from crumbling down, in a metaphorical sense of course! 

Tagged: arts12gallery1

Artist: Paolo Grassino
Title: Semiliberta
Date of Creation: 2010
Location: http://goo.gl/6nCyI
An all aluminum cast piece, Semiliberta is Italian for “probation.” Although there is no concrete description of this work, one is able to see that Italian artist, Paolo Grassino tried to convey the life of a person while on probation. This sculpture shows that a person on probation is never truly “free.” Through Grassino’s biography, he states that this piece was intended to be “apart of society,” by this he meant that he wanted to show the feelings of a prisoner accommodating to societal norms. 

Artist: Paolo Grassino

Title: Semiliberta

Date of Creation: 2010

Location: http://goo.gl/6nCyI

An all aluminum cast piece, Semiliberta is Italian for “probation.” Although there is no concrete description of this work, one is able to see that Italian artist, Paolo Grassino tried to convey the life of a person while on probation. This sculpture shows that a person on probation is never truly “free.” Through Grassino’s biography, he states that this piece was intended to be “apart of society,” by this he meant that he wanted to show the feelings of a prisoner accommodating to societal norms. 

Tagged: arts12gallery1

Spectator, Flatness, Panopticism

Rancier: Spectator 

As Rancier states in The Emancipated Spectator, that in a theater being a spectator means being passive. He explains that being passive in a theatrical setting is a bad thing, because the individual is not engaged in the art that the people displaying the show are conveying. “Looking is deemed the opposite of knowing…standing before an appearance without knowing or understanding what it truly is” (Rancier, 3). Thus meaning that as individuals who see the performances on stage we know what is happening in front of our eyes because we see it, but don’t know the story or history of why it is happening, or why it has been done the way that it is being displayed because we are not active in this particular setting. Rancier also states that what must be done is “a theater without spectators, a theater where spectators will no longer be spectators, where they will learn things instead of being captures by images” (Rancier,3). He expresses the fact that we must eliminate or try to reduce the gap between our knowledge and ignorance. As spectators we need to expand our learning of the theater and understand the story being told and not simply sit inactively “capturing images” (Rancier,6).

Lanier: Flatness

In his article Lanier expresses the fact that this generation is not creating anything “new” even though that is what we call everything today. He states that we are not creating new things but simply “remixing” what has already been done, and has become available through the fabulous internet! Lanier also states and restates that this generation does not stop and will not stop remaking the old. “I long to be shocked and made absolute by new generations of digital culture, but instead I am being tortured by repetition and boredom” (Lanier, 3). As users of the internet we have succumbed to seeing repetition, but are ignorant to the fact that the video we watched yesterday, is the exact same thing as the “new” video that we are watching today. Lanier expresses this with music, saying that before, music was not easy to put together, but today the “Web 2.0” as he puts it has made it so much easier for “composers” that he believes that they are in fact not making new music, but simply “remixing” what has become available to them. “The new century is not yet set up to support its own culture” (Lanier, 10). We are not ready because we haven’t innovated much, or stood up to the word we love to throw around, that being “new.” What is our definition of “new” if we are simply “remixing it” by Lanier’s terms?

Foucault: Panopticism

Foucault embraces the fact that by having what he calls a panopticon, one individual can have control and power of many. “Individuals are enclosed in one place” (Foucault,2).  Without an individual knowing when and where they are being surveillance, the ones who are “watching” them hold absolute power. For example when one is using the internet, visiting many pages there is no way of us knowing who is in a sense “watching us,” thus meaning that we have no power over what others may view pertaining to our persona. “This invisibility is a guarantee of order” (Foucault,5) Foucault expresses that this system of “invisible surveillance” can and has been used in prisons, schools, workplace, and insane asylums by the use of surveillance cameras. “The panoptic schema makes any apparatus of power more intense; it assures its economy (in materials, in personnel, in time); it assures its efficacy by its preventative character, its continuous functioning and its automatic mechanisms” (Foucault, 9)

Tagged: arts12paper3RancierLanierFoucault

Manifesto for New Media Curators

New media art exists all around us, it is changing on a day to day basis. What is new media art today, will change tomorrow. Why is this? Well, because of an amazing thing we call technology. 

Technology and new media art “go hand and hand.” In order to create the new innovations as seen with Yvonne Rainer’s work, a sense of technological advances and new computer programs are essential for making her art. How is one to display this type of art for future generations? For paintings and sculptures we have galleries and museums, but will we be able to store new media art in the same way? NO! For one, there are too many different subtypes of one type of media art. One may focus on the person telling the story through dance, while another focuses on the shapes that are begin created rather than the person behind the scenes creating these shapes, as we saw in lecture. I believe that the best and most efficient way to display the art of the 21st century is by the internet. The internet already holds a vast amount of information about the art that we are able to see throughout different museums around the world. 

The wonderful world of the internet allows us to view things that we would otherwise be unable to see because of time and distance. It is shrinking the world as we know it. By this I mean that everything is becoming more accessible for everyone and the need to travel to see a specific painting or sculpture is no longer necessary because of the internet.  Within the comfort of their own home, the audience for new media art will be able to interact with this type of art in a different way compared to the art that is available for them through museums and galleries. The internet will become a virtual library, just as play lists are available, displaying different genres and albums for music. The same will be available for new media art. Audience members will be able to virtually interact with these pieces by adjusting the volume, adjusting the resolution, etc and of course playing their favorite pieces over and over without any limitations!  

As stated in The Age of Instability, “every medium and human activity has been linked to and made apart of digital networks.” As we become more technologically advanced, artists have also tried to keep up with the new advances and we as curators must not let this “art decay.” We need to have this art available for future generations to see the innovations that have made our world advance. We all use the internet, but not many of us are exposed to the different types of art, which is why we have to take the step in keeping new media art accessible for us all. It may very well be a time consuming task, keeping all forms of art secure but it is essential for our generation today and the future generations. 

http://goo.gl/NFzz5

http://goo.gl/kHRdJ

http://goo.gl/iBupE

http://goo.gl/Eg7un

Tagged: arts12paper2ManifestoNew Media ArtCurators

Arts12 Paper1

After reading both articles from Lev Manovich and Charlie Gere, I quickly realized that the hyperlinks could make the reading both confusing or easier to read. Today in the 21st century things are rapidly changing as hyperlinks are becoming more available. Thus giving authors such as Manovich and Gere more availability to expand on their language and ideas knowing that they are providing their readers these hyperlinks, which in a sense “they can branch off from.” By this I mean, that one hyperlink is able to take a person to one website in which other hyperlinks are available making this a never ending cycle of hyperlinks. In Charlie Gere’s “New Media Art and the Gallery in the Digital Age” I was confused on what “systems art” was and clicked on the hyperlink which took me directly to Wikipedia. The definition was not clear and I found myself clicking on the hyperlink available there in order to figure out what systems art actually was. 

Through Manovich’s 8 Propositions I was able to further my knowledge on new media, however one proposition stood out more than the rest in my opinion. In his second proposition Manovich states “new media as digital data controlled by software.”  As discussed in both articles, new media such as art is being turned over into a searchable image/document through the world wide web, this being controlled by the software. For as glamorous as it might sound, having everything on the internet in my opinion is not the best thing. I would much rather go out to a museum to personally see the art, have a book to physically flip the pages than to live in a virtual world where digital data is controlled by software. 

Having that said I agree with Gere’s assertion that “the gallery has an important role to play in making this art visible, not just now but also in the future, when such work will be part of history.” In my point of view, galleries are a vital part to keeping art in their present conditions. When this type of art is converted into an image that is to be used,"copy/paste" many of its unique elements are taken away. For example, just with the last assignment that we had, the picture that I showed may of had not seemed as a big problem to many, but after seeing the original I was no longer able to see the pencil marks, and the picture is not in color as it appeared to be by Google books. We need the galleries to keep a vivid image of what has made a piece of art contribute to the making of history.

Tagged: Charlie GereLev ManovichUCI Arts 12hyperlinksArts12paper1

Title: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

Author: Jules Verne

Publisher: G.M. Smith, 1873

Original: The University of Michigan

Digitized: March 29, 2008


URL: http://goo.gl/JyOhK

Tagged: Jules Vernearts12gb1

Roy LaGrone graduated in 1989 from the Atlanta College of Art. Today, he is known as a digital media artist who creates three-dimensional pieces from things that have been discarded by other individuals. LaGrone lived in San Antonio, Texas where he spent hours walking the city streets picking peculiar pieces of trash and debris. By using a computer he combines the discarded items that he found with his own photography and sentimental pieces that would result in what he would call, “layers of meaning” or three-dimensional pieces (RoyLaGrone).

As of January 2014 Roy LaGrone has displayed his project, “Beta Projections and Artifacts from Earth” at the Blue Star Contemporary Art Center in Texas where many of his pieces are displayed. One of the pieces displayed at the Art Center is named “Havana Blues,” which truly caught my attention. In “Havana Blues,” LaGrone placed what he calls a personal symbol, being a picture of an inner city clothesline in Cuba which other people would easily be able to relate to, surrounded by a mangled mental container frame. LaGrone shows a futuristic style of computer generated art pieces, such as with his famous “Lay your head on my pillow.” This piece is enveloped around the form of an eye displaying a homeless setting. LaGrone expresses this piece as being “something universal that anyone can recognize, something very human and mundane that can have a lot of meaning.” 

Roy LaGrone:

http://goo.gl/PIaPS

http://goo.gl/UrMs1

http://goo.gl/5QQks

http://goo.gl/RLpCq

Pictures:

Havana Blues- http://goo.gl/QPHFb

Lay Your Head on My Pillow- http://goo.gl/Lx8cO

Tagged: arts12bio1crooksfuturisticartthree-dimensionalartRoyLaGrone